Archive for the ‘Notable Figures’ Category

King Faisal ibn Abdul Azeez

October 13, 2012

Taken from the Saudi government website:

http://www.info.gov.sa/portals/kingdom/kingdomkings.html

 

King Faisal was the third King of Saudi Arabia, reigning from 1964 to 1975.

In 1925, Faisal, in command of his father’s arms, won a decisive victory in the Hijaz. Faisal became viceroy of the Hijaz, thus extending King Abdul Aziz’s remit to the west of the peninsula.

Following the formation of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, Faisal was appointed Minister of Foreign Affairs in 1932. Faisal served as Prime Minister under King Saud.

In 1964, Faisal was named regent and, a few months later in the same year, became king. Although a great respecter of tradition, King Faisal proved to be a far-sighted innovator [not in the religious sense of the word]. In the course of his reign, Faisal initiated a number of major economic and social development plans. Under Faisal, the industrial development of the Kingdom began in earnest. In foreign policy, King Faisal showed a resolute commitment to the essential interests of the Arab and Islamic world.

King Fahd ibn Abdul Azeez

October 13, 2012

Bio taken from the Saudi government website:

http://www.info.gov.sa/portals/kingdom/kingdomkings.html

 

King Fahd, Custodian of the Two Holy Mosques, was the fifth King of Saudi Arabia.

 

King Fahd has brought to his high office a wide range of experience in a number of key posts.

He was appointed the first Saudi Arabian Minister of Education in 1953. He served at that Ministry for five years, laying the foundations for the Kingdom’s ambitious and successful educational program. He became Minister of the Interior in 1962, holding this key position for thirteen years – in the course of which he ensured the Ministry could discharge all its functions as efficiently as any such organization in the world. In 1975, when he became Crown Prince, he had, with consummate grasp of the complexities of the task, undertaken the supervision of both the planning and the implementation of the Kingdom’s second and subsequent five year plans.

It has been, however, in the field of international diplomacy, that Fahd bin Abdul Aziz as king has made his greatest contribution. Working tirelessly, he has brought to bear on the intractable problems of the region his own remarkable subtlety of mind combined with great tenacity of purpose to find, whenever possible, peaceful solutions, based on justice. In the pursuit of this goal, he was always ready to deploy the status and the resources of the Kingdom.

King Fahd died on 1st August, 2005. He was succeeded by Crown Prince Abdullah.

King Malik Abdul Azeez ibn Sa’ud

August 20, 2012

Taken from:

http://www.salafitalk.net/st/viewmessages.cfm?Forum=6&Topic=525

 

 

I will be posting, insha Allaah, some articles on the life of the first King of of the Kingdom Of Saudi Arabia, Abdul-‘Azeez Ibn Saud, rahimahullaah, through the eyes of one who accompanied him for 12 years, from 1926 to 1938 (CE).


The author, Muhammad Almana* was in the court of king and knew many details pertaining to the life of Malik Abdul-‘Azeez ibn Saud (the father of the present king, Fahad Ibn ‘Abdul-Azeez Ibn Saud). This eye-witness account (from his book ‘Arabia United, A Portrait Of Ibn Saud’) should make the reader know the reality of Malik Abdul-Azeez Ibn Saud, the founder of the modern state of Saudi Arabia and the conditions that were prevelant at the time which caused matters to turn out as they did in the region.


The author writes concerning Malik Abdul-‘Azeez, rahimahullaah:
“From the earliest days of his life until its very end, he remained a stauch and devout Muslim, following scrupulously the dictates of the Qur’aan in its every detail. His education in exile in Kuwait was necessarily limited, but this did not prevent him from mastering the Qur’aan and other religious works to a degree that often astounded the ‘ulemah of his own country. One of the injunctions of the Qur’aan is that the faithful should read it as often as possible, and His Majesty (i.e. Malik Abdul-Azeez) always managed to set aside half an hour a day in his crowded schedule to read the Qur’aan and other religious works, particularly those which listed all the many names by which Allaah is known. His majesty seldom had a conversation without quoting a verse from the Qur’aan, upon which he drew a bottomless source of wisdom and inspiration. He was adept at interpreting and explaining the verses in a manner which kept his audience spellbound and enthralled with his insight.


Religion gave a purpose to the King’s life in that the more he expanded and consolidated his Kingdom, the greater was his service to Islaam, which was thus strengthened by his actions. His religious conviction gave him strength in many different ways, yet, however powerful he grew, there was never any danger of his becoming complacent or conceited. The “Wahhaabee”** muslims did not believe in glorifying individuals, and the king knew that as a man he was merely doing his best; everything he achieved was through the will of Allaah alone…”


* The author is writing for an English-speaking Western reader, so his terminologies reflect his target readership. If have adapted where necessary.


** The usage of the term ‘Wahhaabee’ is often used by the opponents of the Salafi da’wah to belittle and discredit those who follow the way of the Prophet, salallaahu alaihi wasallam, and his Companions. However, the author here uses the term for the consumption of a Western reader who has been made acquainted to usage of the term through orientalist literature. So it becomes clear, that he does not intend belittlement, though it would have been better not to use the term at all. The reason for the usage of term by the author is to indicate that these people were from those who benefited from the teachings of the great Scholar, Imaam, Mujadid, Muhawid, Shaykhul-Islaam Muhammad Ibn Abdil-Wahhaab, rahimahullaah

Prince Nayyif bin Abdul Azeez

July 18, 2012

Prince Nayyif was a notable figure who aided the religion.

1. http://www.salafitalk.com/threads/1183-Prince-Naif-bin-Abdul-Azeez-May-Allaah-Have-Mercy-Upon-Him.-A-Plllar-Against-the-Khawarij

Shaikh Muhammad bin Hadi told us last week that Prince Naif was a great man; he worked hard in fighting the terrorism of the khawarij and Ikhwaan. He said he was someone who aided the Sunnah [Naasir Sunnah] and the scholars. He loved them and always sought their advice. Rahimullah

2. http://www.salafitalk.com/threads/1184-Prince-Naif-amp-His-Stance-Against-the-Khawarij-Makkah-1979-The-Haram-is-Seized-by-Them.

One of the main episodes which took place during his position as the Minister of the Interior was the occupation of the Al-Masjid Al-Haraam, Makkah. This is what happened as translated in the Saudi Gazette from the daily newspaper, Al-Watan [1979]

“No one can open the file on Juhaiman bin Saif Al-Otaibi and his group without mentioning the late Crown Prince Naif who was the interior minister at the time. When the group occupied the Grand Mosque, Prince Naif faced the challenge of liberating it. He insisted on overseeing the operation by himself without any outside help.

When Juhaiman and Muhammad Al-Qahtani, who would later become his brother-in-law, joined hands, their collective ideologies began spreading poisonous ideas in small mosques in Madinah. In 1965, Juhaiman established a group called Al-Jamma’a Al-Salafiyya Al-Muhtasiba, which was an extension of the Ikhwan ideology. Soon Juhaiman took control of the group and diverted its tasks to political activities. As the group expanded, he recruited youth from all over the Kingdom. Prince Naif interfered at the time and called for the group’s activities to be supervised. As a result, Juhaiman isolated the group and himself from society.

The Al-Watan newspaper carried the details of the operation in a report on Monday.
In late 1978, Al-Qahtani told Juhaiman that he had had a dream in which he was the Mahdi, or redeemer of Islam, and said he wanted to liberate the Arabian peninsula and the entire world from wrongdoing, injustice and tyranny. On Nov. 20, 1979, 270 people from Juhaiman’s group entered the Grand Mosque under the pretext of attending the Fajr prayer. They were carrying several caskets with them and mosque guards were told they contained bodies. In reality, the caskets contained dozens of weapons that the group would later use to take over the mosque.

During the Fajr prayer, the group chained all of the mosque’s doors and placed two guards at each door. Several other militants stormed the microphone room and took control of the mosque’s loudspeakers. Sheikh Muhammad Al-Subayel, who was leading the prayer, said as soon as the prayer concluded, the group announced the appearance of the Mahdi. They said he had escaped from his enemies and was taking refuge inside the Grand Mosque. Juhaiman then introduced Al-Qahtani as “the awaited Mahdi and the redeemer of Islam.”

Juhaiman and his group then pledged allegiance to Al-Qahtani who asked the people to also do so while members of the group began firing gunshots in the air. The mosque’s guards, who are not armed, tried to resist them but were shot and killed. A group of worshippers managed to escape from the Grand Mosque but others who tried to reason with the group and told them they were wrong were also shot dead.
Prince Naif immediately ordered the Grand Mosque to be surrounded and told officers not to engage in any contact with the group until the authorities had a clearer picture. Security forces began moving inside the mosque complex and some of them managed to position themselves inside and waited for orders to attack. At the same time, Juhaiman’s group was trying to force all worshippers inside to pledge allegiance to the awaited Mahdi.

The then King Khaled met with Muslim scholars and briefed them on the situation. Scholars said a surrender should be negotiated with the group and if they refused, then they should be forcibly evacted even if it meant killing them.

Meanwhile, Prince Naif had arrived in Makkah to personally supervise the operation and plans to liberate the Grand Mosque.
People and residents around the Grand Mosque complex were asked to clear the area due the guns being fired by Juhaiman’s group from the mosque’s minarets. Saudi security forces managed to identify their positions and the type of weapons they were using. Groups from the National Guard were brought in along with the armed forces in preparation to storm the besieged mosque. King Khaled’s directives at that time were to give the group time to surrender and to ensure the safety of the innocent people stuck inside the mosque. Saudi forces used microphones to ask the group to surrender and release the hostages but they refused.

There were scattered clashes with the group and Saudi snipers were brought in to take out the snipers inside the mosque. The Saudi troops already positioned inside also began engaging Juhaiman’s group and forced them to release the hostages. Saudi troops forced the group to withdraw to the tunnels in the lower level beneath the mosque and they then took control of the roads leading to the tunnels.
Juhaiman and his group barricaded themselves in several rooms underneath the Grand Mosque.

After five days of being surrounded, dozens of members in the group surrendered to the authorities. After the news of Al-Qahtani’s death began to spread, many other members laid down their arms and surrendered.On Dec. 5, 1979, the Saudi Army and the National Guard laid out a plan to put an end to the siege. They started a final push and managed to isolate the group far away from the Ka’aba. Saudi forces then cut electricity and water to them. Some immediately surrendered while other continued to fight.The news about French, Jordanian and Egyptian forces participating in the operation to liberate the Grand Mosque was not true. At the time, Saudi Arabia received many offers of help but they were all declined. King Khaled addressed the country’s security forces and the National Guard and thanked them for liberating the Grand Mosque.

On Jan. 10, 1980, 63 people who carried out the attacks were executed in several different cities while Juhaiman was executed in Makkah. The nationalities of the people that were executed are as follows: 34 Saudis, 9 Egyptians, 3 Kuwaitis, 6 Yemenis, 1 Sudanese and 1 Iraqi. Prince Naif said at a press conference after the incident that 19 people went to jail and 23 women and children were sent to juvenile centers.
Prince Naif also announced that 12 Saudi officers and 115 soldiers died during the operation. In addition, 402 officers and 49 soldiers were injured. Prince Naif said 75 members of Juhaiman’s group were killed during the siege. Fifteen bodies belonging to the group were later found in the tunnels underneath the mosque.”

3. http://www.sunnahpublishing.net/modules/Manhaj/wesalafi.pdf  (Shaikh Fawzaan praises and expounds upon some of Prince Nayyif’s speech)