Posts Tagged ‘king’

King Faisal ibn Abdul Azeez

October 13, 2012

Taken from the Saudi government website:

http://www.info.gov.sa/portals/kingdom/kingdomkings.html

 

King Faisal was the third King of Saudi Arabia, reigning from 1964 to 1975.

In 1925, Faisal, in command of his father’s arms, won a decisive victory in the Hijaz. Faisal became viceroy of the Hijaz, thus extending King Abdul Aziz’s remit to the west of the peninsula.

Following the formation of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, Faisal was appointed Minister of Foreign Affairs in 1932. Faisal served as Prime Minister under King Saud.

In 1964, Faisal was named regent and, a few months later in the same year, became king. Although a great respecter of tradition, King Faisal proved to be a far-sighted innovator [not in the religious sense of the word]. In the course of his reign, Faisal initiated a number of major economic and social development plans. Under Faisal, the industrial development of the Kingdom began in earnest. In foreign policy, King Faisal showed a resolute commitment to the essential interests of the Arab and Islamic world.

King Fahd ibn Abdul Azeez

October 13, 2012

Bio taken from the Saudi government website:

http://www.info.gov.sa/portals/kingdom/kingdomkings.html

 

King Fahd, Custodian of the Two Holy Mosques, was the fifth King of Saudi Arabia.

 

King Fahd has brought to his high office a wide range of experience in a number of key posts.

He was appointed the first Saudi Arabian Minister of Education in 1953. He served at that Ministry for five years, laying the foundations for the Kingdom’s ambitious and successful educational program. He became Minister of the Interior in 1962, holding this key position for thirteen years – in the course of which he ensured the Ministry could discharge all its functions as efficiently as any such organization in the world. In 1975, when he became Crown Prince, he had, with consummate grasp of the complexities of the task, undertaken the supervision of both the planning and the implementation of the Kingdom’s second and subsequent five year plans.

It has been, however, in the field of international diplomacy, that Fahd bin Abdul Aziz as king has made his greatest contribution. Working tirelessly, he has brought to bear on the intractable problems of the region his own remarkable subtlety of mind combined with great tenacity of purpose to find, whenever possible, peaceful solutions, based on justice. In the pursuit of this goal, he was always ready to deploy the status and the resources of the Kingdom.

King Fahd died on 1st August, 2005. He was succeeded by Crown Prince Abdullah.

King Malik Abdul Azeez ibn Sa’ud

August 20, 2012

Taken from:

http://www.salafitalk.net/st/viewmessages.cfm?Forum=6&Topic=525

 

 

I will be posting, insha Allaah, some articles on the life of the first King of of the Kingdom Of Saudi Arabia, Abdul-‘Azeez Ibn Saud, rahimahullaah, through the eyes of one who accompanied him for 12 years, from 1926 to 1938 (CE).


The author, Muhammad Almana* was in the court of king and knew many details pertaining to the life of Malik Abdul-‘Azeez ibn Saud (the father of the present king, Fahad Ibn ‘Abdul-Azeez Ibn Saud). This eye-witness account (from his book ‘Arabia United, A Portrait Of Ibn Saud’) should make the reader know the reality of Malik Abdul-Azeez Ibn Saud, the founder of the modern state of Saudi Arabia and the conditions that were prevelant at the time which caused matters to turn out as they did in the region.


The author writes concerning Malik Abdul-‘Azeez, rahimahullaah:
“From the earliest days of his life until its very end, he remained a stauch and devout Muslim, following scrupulously the dictates of the Qur’aan in its every detail. His education in exile in Kuwait was necessarily limited, but this did not prevent him from mastering the Qur’aan and other religious works to a degree that often astounded the ‘ulemah of his own country. One of the injunctions of the Qur’aan is that the faithful should read it as often as possible, and His Majesty (i.e. Malik Abdul-Azeez) always managed to set aside half an hour a day in his crowded schedule to read the Qur’aan and other religious works, particularly those which listed all the many names by which Allaah is known. His majesty seldom had a conversation without quoting a verse from the Qur’aan, upon which he drew a bottomless source of wisdom and inspiration. He was adept at interpreting and explaining the verses in a manner which kept his audience spellbound and enthralled with his insight.


Religion gave a purpose to the King’s life in that the more he expanded and consolidated his Kingdom, the greater was his service to Islaam, which was thus strengthened by his actions. His religious conviction gave him strength in many different ways, yet, however powerful he grew, there was never any danger of his becoming complacent or conceited. The “Wahhaabee”** muslims did not believe in glorifying individuals, and the king knew that as a man he was merely doing his best; everything he achieved was through the will of Allaah alone…”


* The author is writing for an English-speaking Western reader, so his terminologies reflect his target readership. If have adapted where necessary.


** The usage of the term ‘Wahhaabee’ is often used by the opponents of the Salafi da’wah to belittle and discredit those who follow the way of the Prophet, salallaahu alaihi wasallam, and his Companions. However, the author here uses the term for the consumption of a Western reader who has been made acquainted to usage of the term through orientalist literature. So it becomes clear, that he does not intend belittlement, though it would have been better not to use the term at all. The reason for the usage of term by the author is to indicate that these people were from those who benefited from the teachings of the great Scholar, Imaam, Mujadid, Muhawid, Shaykhul-Islaam Muhammad Ibn Abdil-Wahhaab, rahimahullaah